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 Artist Management

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Join date : 2011-11-23

PostSubject: Artist Management    Sat Nov 26, 2011 6:34 am

YOUR AN ARTIST WHAT?????? OH!!! IS THAT ANYTHING LIKE A BABYSITTER!


While I have spent many years in this glorious business at a number of
things from entertainer to booking agent, and have managed a few very good talents along the way, it
comes to my attention that few bands are even aware of what a managers purpose is. Here are some of
the things you should know and ask yourself about finding one, or about the one you already have.**
Is your manager getting things done for you? What exactly should they be getting done? Performers
have a support team in every phase of their career. You may start out by yourself, then work up to a
manager, an agent, then a lawyer. They are also your support team. The more successful you get, the
bigger your team gets. Eventually your team will consist of a manager, an agent, a lawyer, concert
promoters, your Artist Development Rep, road manager, a business manager, and others. When it's just
you and your manager, he/she assumes some of the other team member's duties as well. The manager is
responsible for financial planning, long-term career plans, publicity, marketing, and advising. ****

When you're just starting out, your manager will wear many hats. A manager has to be a cheerleader,
psychiatrist, advisor, guide, problem solver, and what I affectionatly refer to as babysitter. Your manager
will guide you, financially, and with your career, and he/she will protect you from bad business deals, and
shady people. A manager HELPS you with major career decisions. This means YOU still make your own
decisions, your manager will advise you, but you still need to take responsibility for your career. A
personal manager will also help you decide which record company to go with, what publisher to use, and
when you should go on tour. They are also your creativity manager, helping to choose the right songs,
producers, and musicians if needed. Managers handle all requests for time and money, and fight off blood
sucking users. There are a ton of people just waiting for the latest talent to hitch a ride with. You can see
it happen time and time again, mainstream performers with a huge entourage, that entourage is nothing
but a bunch of blood suckers, keep some bug repellent handy! It was MC Hammer's blood sucking
entourage that made him penniless, not his lack of work in recent years.****

Managers can sometimes act as a booking agent. An agent books shows for an artist, but their loyalty
is to the place they are booking you in, not to you. Some states, like California, limit a manager's power
by not allowing them to book shows for their clients, so you need to get advice in that area. They do that
because there is such an abundance of agents in California they don't want managers taking their business
away. Agents work with your manager and concert promoters to set up tours. Some managers do booking
anyway, especially for local or regional acts that aren't ready for an agent. An agent is used for touring, if
you're playing clubs around town, there really isn't a need to pay an agent. Be aware of the laws in your
area.****

When it comes to payment, nothing comes out of your pocket. A manager generally makes between
15 and 20 percent of the artist's income. If you're not making an income, neither are they. If you have a
manager that insists on getting paid no matter what, get out, quickly. That income includes gross receipts
from things like merchandising, tours, publishing, and, of course, the sale of your CD. These terms vary,
according to your agreement or contract. If your manager invests money into the recording of your CD or
other such things, they may ask for a larger cut. Managers can work with a contract or without. The
terms of a contract vary, and there are no rules. Early in your career, contracts usually range in length
from six months to two years. The more advanced music maker may want a longer running contract with
their manager. It's all up to you, make sure you get sound advice, and references. If someone is making
unrealistic promises, avoid them.****

The most important job a manager performs is as confidant. If you can't trust your manager, it's over.
A good artist manager will advertise, publicize, and market you until the cows come home.
Communication is important, your manager only makes money if you are making money, so if they aren't
getting things done, let them know it. How do you know if they are doing a good job? If your CD is
selling, you're playing at least at local clubs, and you get a little press, they are doing their job. Keep the
lines of communication open. The bottom line is; be careful, and beware of blood suckers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


sunny KARMA WORKS flower


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